North Carolina Civil Collaborative Law Association: Making a Live Podcast CLE Possible

North Carolina Civil Collaborative Law Association: Making a Live Podcast CLE Possible

On September 18, 2019, at 6pm, CoLaw in collaboration with the Charlotte Women’s Bar (“CWB”), the North Carolina Civil Collaborative Law Association (“NCCCLA”), Lawyers Mutual, CaseWorks, Lawpods, Charlotte Readers Podcast, and the Mecklenburg County Bar (“MCB”) are having a live podcast CLE featuring Landis Wade and Heidi Brown to discuss the power of introversion in the legal profession.

For thirty-five years (plus or minus), Landis made a career of being a commercial litigator at some of Charlotte’s largest and most respected law firms. Heidi has made a career out of impacting the lives of law students and the legal professional positively through her work as a law professor and as the author of two books published by the American Bar Association—The Introverted Lawyer and Untangling Fear in Lawyering.

The stories Landis and Heidi share are real. The platform to share those stories would not be available if not for the CWB, NCCCLA, Lawyers Mutual, CaseWorks, Lawpods, and MCB. Here’s to them.

The North Carolina Civil Collaborative Law Association

NCCCLA is a non-profit organization that serves as a resource for information about the field of collaborative law. It focuses on educating the public and attorneys about the collaborative law process in hopes that both understand the many inherent advantages of using the collaborative law process as a stand-alone vehicle to resolve disputes outside of traditional forums. To achieve that goal, NCCCLA defines uniform standards and best practices for civil collaborative professionals. It also connects practitioners with other like-minded professionals to increase the vitality and efficacy of the collaborative law movement.

In North Carolina, there are 44 members of the Civil Collaborative Law Association. One can become a member by attending a two-day civil collaborative law training session and by paying an annual membership fee. The benefits of membership are many, but the first that come to mind are: (1) benefitting from being an early adopter in a movement that specifically responds to client complaints about rising and uncertain litigation costs; (2) gaining a better understanding of the legislative process underpinning the increased traction enjoyed by collaborative lawyers; and (3) developing a more robust skillset empowering you to be a problem solver beyond the traditional means, i.e. filing a lawsuit.

Beyond the practical utility of NCCCLA, there’s a can-never-be-quantified intangible benefit from participating in this organization. Lawyers apart of this organization are, as a general rule, thoughtful, introspective, and existential in all the right kind of ways. NCCCLA members are challenged appropriately by the appearance of a lawyer’s disintegrating value proposition, and they work TIRELESSLY to solve that problem. It’s not an easy problem to solve. And they know there is strength in numbers.

In describing NCCCLA’s impact on his professional life, Jeffrey Batts explains: “Over the latter half of the 30+ years I’ve been practicing, I became increasingly frustrated with the civil litigation process for most of the cases I handle—in particular, disputes between owners of businesses, and disputes in the estates and trusts context. Almost invariably the attorneys would give no quarter, nor communicate regularly, and the contest as to which side could out-lawyer the other proceeded with the high costs we expect, increasing bitterness of the parties toward each other. (An avoidable consequence to be sure.) Collaborative offers a better way to resolve disputes that is truly client-centered and focused on the underlying issues that led to the problem—with a wider range of mutually-beneficial solutions that may include remedies not available in the courtroom. My hope is that collaborative attorneys can help achieve better results for clients in a process that is faster, less expensive, and more focused on issues and solutions rather than legal maneuvering.”

CoLaw sincerely thanks NCCCLA for its support of the live podcast CLE on Wednesday, 9/18, at 1026 Jay Street from 6p to 7p. It really wouldn’t be possible without them.

Interested in attending; sign up here.

Lawyers Mutual: Making a Live Podcast CLE Possible

Lawyers Mutual: Making a Live Podcast CLE Possible

Charlotte Women's Bar: Making a Live Podcast CLE Possible

Charlotte Women's Bar: Making a Live Podcast CLE Possible